Buck Rogers in the 25th Century

There was a period, brief but never the less real, when we paid to see television shows in the theater instead of watching them for free on, you know, television. This started back when some crafty producer would take a couple episodes of a TV show and splice them into a single movie — even…

The Girl from Rio

Anyway, this leads to a lot of scenes of people walking down hallways and through vaguely futurist architecture, all while women in skimpy black uniforms of leather and… umm… is that cardboard?… stand at attention.

War of the Robots

Pretty much the only reason this movie went into production was that someone noticed that had a lot of stuff laying around that was used on Brescia’s previous movies and figured they might as well squeeze another movie or two out of it.

Ikarie XB-1

That Ikarie was a high profile undertaking for the studio is clearly evidenced by the obvious expense that went into the film’s large cast, it’s for-the-time above average special effects and, above all, Jan Zazvorka’s production design.

Mission Stardust

Two-fisted astronauts, a swankadelic soundtrack, good looking women, pop art design, and a climactic sequence involving sexy nurses with machine guns fighting robots who shoot lasers out of their eyes.

Wild Wild Planet

Margheriti has to be credited for creating that rarest of rarities: a piece of pulp entertainment that delivers exactly what its title advertises.

Moon Zero Two

Although Hammer was best known for horror films, their entry into horror actually came by way of science fiction. Up until the 1950s, Hammer was pretty much your average low-to-medium budget production house, cranking out a lot of comedies, adventure, and war films. In 1955, however, the studio released a film featuring a popular sci-fi…

World Without End

In the great scheme of things, Forbidden Planet is still probably the coolest of the 50s sci-fi films, if for no other reason than it’s completely weird musical score, but World Without End is a two-fisted action-packed little brother that may not be as respectable or ambitious, but just might be more fun.

Space Thunder Kids

Anyone who is a fan of colossally, brain-fryingly bizarre and incompetent films, anyone who is a fan of old anime and will love playing spot the influence (and sometimes you can spot a couple influences on one robot, as bodies and heads are switched with reckless abandon), and I guess anyone who would want to see a giant robot space opera that randomly cuts to a whole strange TRON sequence, then Space Thunder Kids is well worth the dollar.

Mirror’s Edge

Frustrating, flawed, and fun; sometimes infuriating, sometimes breathtaking. I can’t think of a game that would more accurately reflect the character of many of the movies I end up championing.

Devil’s Dynamite

A movie that awkwardly tapes together a turgid underworld drama with a movie in which a laughing Caucasian thug and a Taoist priest use gyonshi to battle a dude who sometimes, for no reason that is ever explained, transforms into a space-helmeted, silver foil clad “Futuristic Warrior.” Oh, and also sometimes…ninjas!

Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone

Look, I never said I was proud of the things I liked when I was kid, alright? And I’m even less proud of some of the things I watched now, some twenty years later, all excited about realizing how stupid they are only to realize that while, yes, they are pretty stupid, I still don’t…