Unfortunately, the remainder of the film’s obsession with mythology building and referencing previous films results in a tangled mess that, despite being over two hours in length, still feels like an hour of the film is missing.


The Pan Am Worldport

In Live and Let Die, the first of Roger Moore’s many James Bond films, 007 arrives in New York via the Pan Am Worldport, one of the great feats of airport architecture.


Gimlets with Fleming and Marlowe

The gimlet is one of the great, unsung heroes of the cocktail world. Simple, refreshing, easy to make — and favored by everyone from British sailors to private eye Philip Marlowe, It was during the great mid-century cocktail revival that young Ian Fleming came into his own as the gadabout and Bond vivant we know him…


Trout Fishing in Sicily

The utterly bizarre tale of how the creator of James Bond and the creator of the American mafia helped plan the Allied invasion of Sicily during World War II. Beyond Risico, James Bond’s forays into Italy are often little more than passthroughs. Bond spends more time in Italy in the movies — most notably Moonraker,…


Alexander the Great

The first drink James Bond has in Risico, while meeting with his contact Kristatos, is a Negroni. Risico prominently features one more cocktail, if in a somewhat dismissive fashion. Kristatos identifies himself to Bond at the Hotel Excelsior’s bar with a signal: an Alexander, which amuses 007. “Bond had been told to look for a…


James Bond vs. the ’80s

We are increasingly left with a sort of bland guy who just happens to be named James Bond — which, in a way, might be bringing the character back around to how Fleming originally imagined him, as an anonymous blunt instrument into whom a reader could pour his or her own identity; a characterless cypher of a man who might not be interesting but to whom interesting things happened. But honestly, by the middle of the 1980s, with decades of suave, awesome James Bond under our belts, did anyone really want an anonymous 007?